Happy Last Day of Summer….?

This week consisted of lots garden “housekeeping.” Weeds were pulled, branches were transformed into woodchips, and grass was mowed. Now that the seedlings are (mainly) planted in the ground, any of the dead crops from summer must go.

Pulling up dying blueberry bushes

Pulling up dying blueberry bushes

Erin eliminating weeds

Erin eliminating weeds

One big project was cleaning up the basil bed. Basil is a well-known and popular plant. But since it only grows in the summer, it was on top of the list to remove.

Cate and Kate enjoying the smells of basil leaves

Cate and Kate enjoying the smells of basil leaves

Common types of basil are sweet basil, purple, lemon and Thai basil. The bushy leaves are very fragrant. Technically an herb, basil needs moist soil and about 10 to 12 inches of space in between each plant.

Basil bush!

Basil bush!

If you are truly a basil fan, you can start planting seeds indoors about 6 weeks before the last spring frost. After the last frost date, the seedlings can be planted about ¼ inch deep. Once you are ready to harvest, basil can be used in lots of ways. Many people use it in a pesto sauce. Basil can also be used in vegetable soups and salads. You can even put basil on pizza, and in smoothies and cocktails!

Although the first day of fall is September 22, don’t despair that summer is over. For inspiration for this upcoming fall, or even this upcoming week, take some of the advice from the sign below that is hanging in the garden!

“Advice from a garden: Cultivate lasting friendships, sow seeds of kindness, and no vineing!”

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